Marnie’s experience with the Industry Mentoring Program

Marnie’s Experience with the Industry Mentoring Program

By Alex Hargreaves

marniestewartMarnie was in her second year of Bachelor of Business, majoring in Human Resources, when the Industry Mentoring Program sparked her interest.  As her graduation date loomed closer, Marnie suddenly became aware that she lacked work experience and was determined to change this before the end of her degree. She read about the Industry Mentoring Program and could see that it had true potential to prepare her for the work force.

“As a student, I was quite shy throughout my years at university and found the thought of talking to professionals very intimidating.  I wanted to get to know someone already working in the HR industry so that I could build upon my confidence and learn how to talk to people in a professional manner”.

Luckily, Marnie reports that she got a long really well with her mentor and felt at ease around him.  She could see that he was passionate about ensuring that students in his field of study had the opportunity to undertake work experience and he was willing to take Marnie to his business meetings and provide her with real world examples that she could use for her assignments.

“By attending meetings with my mentor, I was able to apply the knowledge I learnt at university to contribute my take on things in the meetings.  Attending the meetings helped me to understand to a greater extent why I was studying certain topics at university and how they applied to a real world context.  The meetings also helped me to network with others in the company and as a result I made many professional contacts”.

Due to Marnie’s enthusiasm and persistence during the program, she was able to land a full time job as a HR administrator in her mentor’s company straight after she graduated.  Marnie has been working with the company for 6 years now and has undertaken various different roles during that time.  She currently works as a HR advisor, assisting the recruitment team.

Marnie advises all Griffith students who are tossing up whether to apply for the Industry Mentoring Program to take the plunge and go for it.  However, Marnie warns that there is no point in signing up if you are not going to immerse yourself in the program and make the most of it.

“I see students come through the mentor program that just do it for the sake of it.  I guess they think it will look good on their resume.  Students with a blasé attitude never end up gaining employment when the program ends.  If you show initiative and are eager to learn, there is every chance that you could land yourself a good job at the end.”

Marnie describes her experience with the Industry Mentoring Program as the best decision she made whilst she was still a student.

“The program literally kick started my career.  Had I chickened out of applying, who knows where I would be working now!”

 


An Ode to Griffith: So Long, So Farewell

kyliefarewell

By Kylie Robinson

Major heartbreak, meeting and marrying the love of my life, completing a postgraduate qualification and making lifelong friends marks some defining moments of my Griffith University career. I start this blog post with descriptions of personal tragedies and exhilarating highs because career growth and life experience don’t happen separately – they occur simultaneously. After almost 10 years as a proud member of the Griffith clan, today marks my last day. My life  is nearly unrecognisable to the naive, terrified 24 year old who started at the university, unsure and anxious about the step I was taking.

As I sit down to write this blog, I’m not really sure how to articulate my feelings. How do I explain what this place represents to me? The words came to my mind earlier but as I write now it’s not so easy to articulate my feelings about the place I know as my home away from home. Griffith is so much more than just my workplace; it’s where I’ve grown up.

Read the rest of this entry »


Technology transforming our world

???????????????????????????????“University is an incredible catalyst for extracting ambition and allowing it to flourish.”

Bachelor of Information Technology graduate Benjamin Hall shares his motivation for pursuing a university degree, his love of technology and his processes and dedication for achieving a graduate position in his field.

What made you decide to go to university?

During high school I had no real aspirations to study further as I wanted to be a chef. My parents weren’t so sure but my mother presented a strong case for more study which stuck with me forever. A year later I promised my late mother I would go to university for her and started working harder. In my final year at high school, I received the Griffith University Gold Coast Award and a direct offer to study a double degree in business. Although I didn’t study business, my promise to my mother was the real motivation to study at university. Since I walked into Griffith, I loved every moment and am so thankful of the words my mother spoke.

Read the rest of this entry »


Flying solo with an education degree

Jacqui Close Up2014 Education graduate Jacquelyn Nesbitt spoke to us about why she chose education, her study journey and her hopes after graduation.

What did you study and why?

Ever since I started school I knew I wanted to be a teacher, so naturally, when the time (finally) came to choose what I wanted to study, I enrolled in a Bachelor of Education (Primary). After studying for two years you’re given the opportunity to choose a specialist area, and I chose Middle Schooling as I really enjoyed teaching in the middle years (years 4 to 9).

What were the most interesting things you learned in your degree?

My degree at Griffith University was filled with so many interesting learning experiences. Not only did I learn my teacher’s tricks of the trade, but I also understood how to create engaging learning experiences that can cater for a variety of students.

Read the rest of this entry »


20 years of student mentoring honoured

FrankGold Coast financial adviser Frank Byrne has been recognised for 20 years’ mentoring of Griffith Business School students as part of the Griffith Industry Mentoring Program.

Frank, who is now 73 years old, was one of the first mentors to join the program when it began in 1994. That was just four years after he graduated from the Griffith Business School himself.

“I just wanted to give back to Griffith in return for all the opportunities I have been given as a result of my studies there,” Frank said.

Frank graduated with a Bachelor of Commerce in 1990 when he was 50. He completed his studies part-time while working at the Department of Primary Industries, where he had been employed as an administration officer for 37 years.

Read the rest of this entry »


Jazz the night away – Kristin Berardi

Kristin-BerardiWith many accolades to her name, Kristin Berardi won the Montreux Jazz Festival International Vocal Competition in 2006, two National Australian Bell Awards for the Best Jazz Vocal Album in 2010 and 2012 , the first and only vocalist to receive the Freedman National Jazz Award 2010; has released a number of albums and toured nationally and overseas. Graduating in 2003 with a Bachelor of Music from the Queensland Conservatorium, Kristin now shares her expertise with current students in the Jazz Voice course.

The Careers and Employment team asked Kristin about her amazing journey from student to professional musician, her influencers and the tips she can provide budding musicians.

Read the rest of this entry »


An unplanned path to academia – John Selby

John-SelbyAs a lecturer at Macquarie University in the Department of Accounting and Corporate Governance, Dr John Selby confesses he took an unusual path on his way to academia. At age 15, John was already deciding which university to attend and degree to pursue. His parents had left school early and as the first in his family to go to university, he was drawn to Griffith University to study combined law and international business degrees. “I just didn’t want to study law on its own and wanted to have another degree. I felt the academic staff at Griffith focused on ensuring students learned as much as possible and there was a focus on a new generation of university students.”

Read the rest of this entry »